Dunbar’s number

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Dunbar’s number represents how large a group can be without having major conflicts.  On average the number varies from 100 to 150 people. Businesses use this number when looking to expand.  When a group exceeds this number xenophobia, discrimination, and segregation appears. 

Steps in thoughts:
In/out
We love to be around people with similar value and taste. We also love being around people that are at a level that we are trying to attain. People who do not share similar values or hold us back are not welcomed.

Up/down
Rank structure exists everywhere.  It’s not just limited to the military. We hold each other to that structure. Even to the point that we sometimes forget to humble ourselves.

Truth is, there is no in or out. There is no up or down. You are as valuable as I am. My 19+ years in the military does not constitute a higher status than you hold. We are all equal and we must maintain that mind set.

Social media may have exponentially increase my social interaction, but there are only a select group that I regularly conduct business with and keep tabs on. That number is well below 150.

Maybe this is why I get along with “everyone”. There may be some unseen value in the Dunbar number. I truly believe in being selective, but not judgemental. I look forward to seeing your thoughts on the Dunbar number.

Thanks 🙂

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2 thoughts on “Dunbar’s number

    howsyourlovelife said:
    January 6, 2016 at 9:40 am

    I have definitely seen this in the church realm, as we have launched four small churches from the beginning. They say that one pastor can lead up to 250 people, and then there must be shared leadership in some form, but I think the relationships start breaking down below this number because people need more attention than one person can provide. This may not line up exactly with what you’re writing about, but it’s the environment that I know.

    Liked by 1 person

      stevenjcurtis responded:
      January 6, 2016 at 12:10 pm

      This does apply. Exodus mention how a basic governing body should be set up… officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens. This breakdown keeps immediate relations well below 100 people per person. Churches are often broken into groups for similar reasons. Thanks for bringing this to light. 🙂

      Like

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